Comments for The Word Detective http://qw2ukak.icu Semper Ubi Sub Ubi Wed, 15 Apr 2020 17:41:03 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 Comment on Powder, to take a by Darren E http://qw2ukak.icu/2010/06/powder-to-take-a/comment-page-1/#comment-861488 Wed, 15 Apr 2020 17:41:03 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=3272#comment-861488 I had to laugh when reading that a “mickey” or “Mickey Finn” was supposedly a ‘powerful laxative’! In the 20’s and 30’s the term Mickey Finn was similar (at least conceptually) with a “roofie”, “knock out drops” or a powerful sedative. The idea of slipping a powerful laxative into someone’s drink isn’t just funny, but also potentially pretty gross. I’ve seem old gangster movies that used a Mickey to overpower or disable a foe.
网络版斗地主 The theory that the origin of “take a powder” stems from taking headache powder makes much more sense than the others listed. I have heard ‘take a powder’ in reference to skiing, but it was as part of an advertising campaign for a ski resort during the 80’s.

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Comment on Bespoke by Christian Aust http://qw2ukak.icu/2012/02/bespoke/comment-page-1/#comment-861125 Tue, 14 Apr 2020 13:36:30 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=6448#comment-861125 网络版斗地主I’d like to add that “bespoke” always reminds me of the german “besprechen”, english “to discuss”. “Bespoke” feels like past tense, something that you discussed.

Thanks for the great site, just discovered it.

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Comment on Clodhopper by Tina Lynn http://qw2ukak.icu/2014/03/clodhopper/comment-page-1/#comment-860881 Mon, 13 Apr 2020 17:06:13 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=9816#comment-860881 Perhaps I’m commiting necromancy, but I’d like to note that sturdy farmer boots, perhaps hob-nailed and rather unsophisticated, were known as clod-hoppers. Emphasis on utility, not combat.

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Comment on I swan by J Radford http://qw2ukak.icu/2013/09/i-swan/comment-page-1/#comment-860491 Sun, 12 Apr 2020 03:22:29 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=8524#comment-860491 网络版斗地主I think it means, I swear. When I was growing up in Western Tennessee, my mother and her friends used to say it when gossiping when they thought the kids weren’t listening. But at my parent’s parties, late in the evening when my siblings and I were thought to be asleep, my Dad and his army buddies would start swapping stories, amd they often finished a tale, or exclaimed over one by saying, “I swanny to God”. That’s how I figured out swan meant swear.

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Comment on Dirty Pool by Wendy http://qw2ukak.icu/2014/05/dirty-pool/comment-page-1/#comment-860305 Sat, 11 Apr 2020 13:57:28 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=9631#comment-860305 I don’t know you, and I’m not in your 20-some-years-ago brain, but I’ll bet the word grinch also played into your thinking stinch was a word. Stingy + grinch with a touch of stint maybe.

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Comment on Cool beans by Dean http://qw2ukak.icu/2009/11/cool-beans/comment-page-1/#comment-860072 Fri, 10 Apr 2020 17:45:34 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=2115#comment-860072 Cool Beans
I use this term quite often as a replacement for more common terms such as excellent, fantastic, awesome and great. The first time I heard this used was in a 1967 cartoon called Speed Racer. Kuior Mifune and his pet and or friend Chim Chim would hide in the trunk of the car. When something went well for the characters he would yell out Cool Beans with excitement. I then discovered it in the 1935 movie adaptation of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, a movie we have all seen every year since childhood.
When Scrooge awakes from his nightmare and gives his maid a five shilling a week raise, she excitedly responds with cool beans, and bobs your uncle. This term may have been used commonly in the 1840’s and earlier.

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Comment on Hunker Down by C Johnston http://qw2ukak.icu/2014/05/hunker-down/comment-page-1/#comment-860032 Fri, 10 Apr 2020 14:55:34 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=9650#comment-860032 Always considered hunkered down to mean staying put for some reason. Let’s say on a yacht during a storm, hunkered down in the cabin below deck. The definition can extend to extreme focus on a specific objective in a specific locaton as in, he hunkered down in his study until completing the anxiously awaited report.

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Comment on Bar ditch by Kathleen http://qw2ukak.icu/2012/02/bar-ditch/comment-page-1/#comment-858901 Mon, 06 Apr 2020 21:06:29 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=6359#comment-858901 网络版斗地主Very interesting.

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Comment on Hoodoo & Cake by Beau Melvin http://qw2ukak.icu/2009/03/hoodoo-cake/comment-page-1/#comment-858801 Mon, 06 Apr 2020 13:58:04 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=631#comment-858801 The version I grew up on was the first one was a no-gooder and the second one a fake.

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Comment on Jack Robinson by Martin Pook http://qw2ukak.icu/2012/06/jack-robinson/comment-page-1/#comment-858624 Sun, 05 Apr 2020 21:15:32 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=7604#comment-858624 I did wonder how jack fitted with a ‘jack plane’, but thinking about it, it is the most useful general purpose plane. I’d long wondered about the derivation of Jack Robinson, and now I can carry on wondering!

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Comment on Wool by Melissa http://qw2ukak.icu/2010/06/wool/comment-page-1/#comment-858164 Sat, 04 Apr 2020 16:51:00 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=3371#comment-858164 My father, who grew up in southwest Virginia and was of English, German, and maybe Scots-Irish descent, used “wool” as a verb specifically in reference to over-enthusiastic cuddling or petting of the cat. My dad would translate the wriggling cat’s sentiments as “Stop wooling me!” Only as I’ve continued to use the phrase this way have I realized it’s uncommon.

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Comment on Kemosabe by Anonymous http://qw2ukak.icu/2011/07/kemosabe/comment-page-1/#comment-858032 Sat, 04 Apr 2020 04:00:01 +0000 http://qw2ukak.icu/?p=6112#comment-858032 网络版斗地主Tonto does not translate to stupid…silly yes not stupid

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